Weekly Wrap Up: October 6th through October 12th, 2019

Books I’ve Read:

Small Town Secrets

Christmas in Harmony Harbor

Cilka’s Journey

Lethal Nights

The Earl of Smuggler’s Cove

The Devil’s Apprentice

The Dark Lord Clementine


Books with Pending Reviews:

The Dark Lord Clementine—review coming October 10th

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World—review coming October 8th

Delicious Disasters—review coming October 7th


Books with Published Reviews:

The Earl of Smuggler’s Cover—Review Here

The Devil’s Apprentice—Review Here

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World—Review Here

Delicious Disasters—Review Here

The Grace Year—Review Here


NetGalley Requests:

Ruthless Gods (NetGalley wish)


Author/Publisher/Blog Tour Review Requests:

An Everyday Hero—Publisher Request (St. Martin’s Press)


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

Sons of Fire—Cover Reveal

Shadow Weaver—Book Blitz

The Sister Series—Book Blitz

Sweet Retribution—Release Blitz

One More Song—C.M. Seabrook

Fool’s Bargain—Cover Reveal

Prestigious—Cover Reveal

Playing with Fire—Book Blitz

Corrupted Enchantment—Book Blitz

The Book Witch—Book Blitz

To Wake the Dead—Book Blitz

Storm—Cover Reveal

The Dark Lord Clementine—Blog Tour

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World—Blog Tour

Roughing the Kicker—Book Blitz

Off Balance—Cover Reveal

Delicious Disasters—Blog Tour

Million Miles Away—Book Blitz

The Twelfth Knight—Book Blitz


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

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Blog Tour: The Dark Lord Clementine by Sarah Jean Horwitz

The Dark Lord Clementine by [Horwitz, Sarah Jean]

4 Stars

Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers

Date of publication: October 1st, 2019

Genre: Children’s Fiction, Fantasy, Middle Grade

Where you can find The Dark Lord Clementine: Barnes and Noble | Amazon | BookBub

Book Synopsis:

Dastardly deeds aren’t exactly the first things that come to mind when one hears the name “Clementine,” but as the sole heir of the infamous Dark Lord Elithor, twelve-year-old Clementine Morcerous has been groomed since birth to be the best (worst?) Evil Overlord she can be. But everything changes the day the Dark Lord Elithor is cursed by a mysterious rival.

Now, Clementine must not only search for a way to break the curse, but also take on the full responsibilities of the Dark Lord. As Clementine forms her first friendships, discovers more about her own magic than she ever dared to explore, and is called upon to break her father’s code of good and evil, she starts to question the very life she’s been fighting for. What if the Dark Lord Clementine doesn’t want to be dark after all?


First Line:

Clementine Morcerous awoke one morning to discover that her father had no nose.

The Dark Lord Clementine by Sarah Jean Horwitz

My Review:

I am always on the lookout for books that my almost 12 year old can read. My son is a voracious reader and will read anything that I give him. So, when I saw The Dark Lord Clementine’s blurb, my interest was caught. I thought to myself: “My son would like this, but I need to read the book first.” I am glad that I did because The Dark Lord Clementine was a great read!!

The Dark Lord Clementine is the story about a girl named Clementine. She lives in a dilapidated castle with her Dark Lord father. One day, Clementine notices her father is missing his nose. That is when she finds out that the Whittle Witch has cursed him. Clementine takes it upon herself to try and find a cure for the curse. She also tries to assume the Dark Lord duties that her father cannot do. With the Whittle Witch waiting to take over the castle, Clementine is running out of time. Can she save her father?

The plotline for The Dark Lord Clementine was evenly paced. The flow of the book was perfect. It wasn’t too fast or too slow. There was no lag in the book or dropped plotlines either, which I enjoyed.

I loved Clementine. She was a timid little girl at the beginning of the book. But as the book went on, I could see her character growth. By the end of the book, she became this confident young woman. I loved it!!

I did feel bad for Clementine. She didn’t have any friends. Well, human friends. She did have the nightmares and the black sheep for company. But other than that, nothing. She longed for friends, even if she wouldn’t admit it to herself. Hiding in the shadows and watching the villagers play said so much. So, when Sebastian and then Darka befriended her, I was happy. Clementine needed it.

I didn’t care for Darka at the beginning of the book. I didn’t like that she befriended Clementine so that she could gain favor and hunt in the woods around the castle. I didn’t like that she was hunting unicorns. But I liked that her story had more depth to it. When it was revealed, I started to pity her. But, it was Darka’s actions at the end of the book that made me love her!!!

I loved the humor in the book. The Gricken is the most notable one. When Clementine was younger, she tried to turn a frog into a chicken. Unfortunately (and hilariously), the spell backfired, and she turned her family grimoire into it. If she wants to learn a spell, she has to wait for the Gricken to lay an egg. There is a hilarious scene where Clementine pleads with the Gricken to lay an egg. I laughed so hard; I had tears in my eyes.

The end of The Dark Lord Clementine was perfect. I am not going to get into it because of major spoilers. I will say that what Clementine did was brave. The way the book ended made me wonder if there was going to be a book 2.


I would give The Dark Lord Clementine a Tween rating. There is no sex. There is no language. There is very mild violence. I would recommend that no one under the age of 10 read this book.

I would reread The Dark Lord Clementine. I would recommend it to family and friends.

**I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book**

Blog Tour: Naked Mole Rat Saves the World by Karen River

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World by [Rivers, Karen]

3 Stars

Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers

Date of publication: October 15th, 2019

Genre: Children’s Fiction, Middle Grade

Where you can find Naked Mole Rat Saves the World: Barnes and Noble | Amazon | BookBub

Book Synopsis:

Can Kit’s super-weird superpower save her world?

Kit-with-a-small-k is navigating middle school with a really big, really strange secret: When she’s stressed, she turns into a naked mole rat.

It first happened after kit watched her best friend, Clem, fall and get hurt during an acrobatic performance on TV. Since then, the transformations keep happening—whether kit wants them to or not. Kit can’t tell Clem about it, because after the fall, Clem just hasn’t been herself. She’s sad and mad and gloomy, and keeping a secret of her own: the real reason she fell.

A year after the accident, kit and Clem still haven’t figured out how to deal with all the ways they have transformed—both inside and out. When their secrets come between them, the best friends get into a big fight. Somehow, kit has to save the day, but she doesn’t believe she can be that kind of hero. Turning into a naked mole rat isn’t really a superpower. Or is it?


First Line:

Kit’s Mom had a tattoo that wound around her left wrist.

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World by Karen Rivers

My Review:

I am always on the lookout for middle-grade books. I have a tween who devours books left and right. My son can’t read them fast enough. So, when I read the blurb for Naked Mole Rat Saves the World, I thought of him. From the blurb, I thought that this would be an excellent book to read. But, after reading the book, I do have some doubts about letting him read it.

The storyline for Naked Mole Rat Saves the World centers around two friends, kit and Clem. kit (always spelled with a lowercase k) lives with her mother above her mother’s beauty salon. kit is dealing with a lot for a girl of 12. Her mother is a famous ex-singer who is agoraphobic (among other things). She never leaves her apartment or beauty salon. That leaves kit shouldering a majority of her mother’s responsibilities.

On top of that, kit is tiny due to being born a micro-preemie, and she suffers from Alopecia Universalis. She has zero hair on her body and is often mistaken for a cancer patient. It is a lot for a 12-year-old to handle.

Clem is kit’s best friend. She and her brother, Jorge, come from a loud, vibrant family. Clem’s family are acrobats, and they are good at it. So good, that they decide to compete on a show like America’s Got Talent. It’s on that show that Clem has an awful accident. That accident has a ripple effect on her and kit’s life.

The plotline for Naked Mole Rat Saves the World was steady. It is perfect for younger kids or adults who like books that are on the slower side. There was some lag, but the author was able to get the book back on track. I also loved the world and character building.

I felt terrible for kit in Naked Mole Rat Saves the World. She was raising herself. She had to deal with a lot for a 12-year-old. Her best friend changed (and not in a good way), her mother was falling deeper into her mental illness, and there was this guy robbing people dressed up as Batman. No wonder she had anxiety. She was alone when she first changed into a naked mole-rat, and it scared the bejesus out of her. There was a point where I wondered if transforming into the mole rat was all in her head (a symptom of her anxiety), but I was proven wrong.

Poor Clem. Her life drastically changed after her accident on national TV. She turned into this Goth/emo girl who was nasty to everyone. She pushed people away (including kit) and acted out. She became fascinated by her biological grandfather, who was one of the victims in the Jonestown Massacre. I was worried about her, and I couldn’t believe that her parents and grandparents weren’t concerned with her drastic personality change!!!!

There were several sub plotlines in the book that were interesting too. Such as Jackson and why kit hated him. I got why she hated him (he shouldn’t have done that). I also understood why he did it. He was hurting and wanted kit to hurt with him.

I didn’t like Samara. I know this is a kids’ book, but I wanted to throat punch her after that one scene. I was MAD. How dare she say that to kit. Not only was unacceptable, but she overstepped her bounds. kit was allowed to have her dreams and wish her mother could do things.

The end of Naked Mole Rat Saves the World was the best part of the book. The author was able to merge all the plotlines. I also loved that kit was able to use her superpower to save her mother’s world!!!!

I do want to include a warning about Naked Mole Rat Saves the World. Several subjects come up that might not be appropriate for younger kids. To name some of them: bullying, Jonestown (and how the people died), depression, mental illness, and anxiety. Now all these as a whole isn’t bad, but kids might have questions about them. Also, some kids might be triggered them. So be prepared to answer questions while reading the book.


I would give Naked Mole Rat Saves the World a Young Teen rating. There is no sex. There is no language. There is very mild violence. I would recommend that no one under the age of 13 read this book.

I am on the fence if I would reread Naked Mole Rat Saves the World. I am also on the fence if I would recommend it to family and friends.

**I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book**

Weekly Wrap Up: September 29th through October 5th 2019

Clicking on titles under Books I’ve ReadNetGalley Requests,and Author/Publisher Requests will take you to Goodreads.

Clicking on titles under Books with Pending Reviews and Books with Published Reviews will take you to Amazon.

Clicking on titles Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz will take you to that specific blog post.

Clicking on links under Giveaways I’ve Entered will take you to that giveaway

Clicking on the links under Weekly Posts will take you to that specific blog post.


Books I’ve Read:

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World

Delicious Disasters

Amy’s Square

Demons at War

Highland Jewel


Books with Pending Reviews:


Books with Published Reviews:

Highland Jewel—Review Here

Demons at War: Urban Fantasy—Review Here

Amy’s Square—Review Here

What Rose Forgot—Review Here

Shantallow—Review Here


NetGalley Requests:

The Woman in the Mirror

Follow Me

Unmanageable

Alone in the Wild


Author/Publisher/Blog Tour Review Requests:

The Professor of Immortality—Delphinium


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

Starlight—Cover Reveal

Beg for Mercy—Cover Reveal

Bohannon—Cover Reveal

Johnny—Book Blitz

Perfect—Cover Reveal

The Memory Thief—Book Blitz

A Baby for the Bratva—Book Blitz

When Love Simply Is—Book Blitz

Alien Love: Ella & Krian—Book Blitz

Marrow Charm—Book Blitz

Prince Poison—Book Blitz

Knight Rising—Book Blitz

Unintentional Obsession—Book Blitz

Chasing Beverly—Book Blitz

To Kill a Fae—Book Blitz

Shantallow—Blog Tour

Out of Bounds—Book Blitz


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Weekly Wrap Up: July 21st through July 27th 2019

Clicking on titles under Books I’ve ReadNetGalley Haul,and Email Haul will take you to Goodreads.

Clicking on titles under Books with Pending Reviews and Books with Published Reviews will take you to Amazon.

Clicking on titles Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz will take you to that specific blog post.

Clicking on links under Giveaways I’ve Entered will take you to that giveaway

Clicking on the titles under Freebies I Scored will take you to Goodreads.

Clicking on the links under Weekly Posts will take you to that specific blog post.



Books I’ve Read:

Jake’s Redemption

T-Minus

Lost and Love: Thailand

Clockwork Image

Every Love



Books with pending reviews:


Books with published reviews:

Clockwork Image: Review Here

Nocturne in Ashes: Review Here

Every Love: Review Here

All Boy—Review Here


NetGalley Haul:

Naked Mole Rat Saves the World

Diamond City

The Curious Heart of Alisa Rae

What Rose Forgot


Email Haul:

Rise of the Dragon

Return of the Long Lost Earl (not on Goodreads yet)

Look for Me Under the Rainbow

The Kilwade Tragedy


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz:

Every Love—Blog Tour

All Boy—Blog Tour


Giveaways I’ve Entered:

What Red Was—Read it Forward


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Freebie Sunday

Music Monday

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Theme Thursday

Throwback Thursday: April 11th, 2019

Image result for throwback thursday meme books

This week’s Throwback Thursday is a children’s classic

Black Beauty by [Sewell, Anna]
click on picture for Amazon link

Black Beauty spends his youth in a loving home, surrounded by friends and cared for by his owners. But when circumstances change, he learns that not all humans are so kind. Passed from hand to hand, Black Beauty witnesses love and cruelty, wealth and poverty, friendship and hardship . . . Will the handsome horse ever find a happy and lasting home? Carefully retold in clear contemporary language, and presented with delightful illustrations, these favorite classic stories capture the heart and imagination of young readers. By retelling the story in a shorter, simpler form, these books become highly engaging for children, and the color illustrations help with both comprehension and interest level. Black Beauty is part of a collectible series that has strong gift appeal.


Have you read Black Beauty?

What are your thoughts on it?

Let me know!!

Throwback Thursday: August 30th, 2018

Image result for throwback thursday meme books

I’ve decided to do Throwback Thursday but blog style. I am going to select a book I have read before and see if I would still read it.

This week’s Throwback Thursday is a classic.

The Secret Garden

click on the picture for Amazon link.

“One of the most delightful and enduring classics of children’s literature, The Secret Garden by Victorian author Frances Hodgson Burnett has remained a firm favorite with children the world over ever since it made its first appearance. Initially published as a serial story in 1910 in The American Magazine, it was brought out in novel form in 1911. 

The plot centers around Mary Lennox, a young English girl who returns to England from India, having suffered the immense trauma by losing both her parents in a cholera epidemic. However, her memories of her parents are not pleasant, as they were a selfish, neglectful and pleasure-seeking couple. Mary is given to the care of her uncle Archibald Craven, whom she has never met. She travels to his home, Misselthwaite Manor located in the gloomy Yorkshire, a vast change from the sunny and warm climate she was used to. When she arrives, she is a rude, stubborn and given to stormy temper tantrums. However, her nature undergoes a gradual transformation when she learns of the tragedies that have befallen her strict and disciplinarian uncle whom she earlier feared and despised. Once when he’s away from home, Mary discovers a charming walled garden which is always kept locked. The mystery deepens when she hears sounds of sobbing from somewhere within her uncle’s vast mansion. The kindly servants ignore her queries or pretend they haven’t heard, spiking Mary’s curiosity. 

The Secret Garden appeals to both young and old alike. It has wonderful elements of mystery, spirituality, charming characters and an authentic rendering of childhood emotions and experiences. Commonsense, truth and kindness, compassion and a belief in the essential goodness of human beings lie at the heart of this unforgettable story. It is the best known of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s works, though most of us have definitely heard of, if not read, her other novel Little Lord Fauntleroy. 

The book has been adapted extensively on stage, film, and television and translated into all the world’s major languages. In 1991, a Japanese anime version was launched for television in Japan. It remains a popular and beloved story of a child’s journey into maturity, and a must-read for every child, parent, teacher, and anyone who would enjoy this fascinating glimpse of childhood. One of the most delightful and enduring classics of children’s literature, The Secret Garden by Victorian author Frances Hodgson Burnett has remained a firm favorite with children the world over ever since it made its first appearance. Initially published as a serial story in 1910 in The American Magazine, it was brought out in novel form in 1911.” 

Other places you can find The Secret Garden: Barnes and Noble | AbeBooks | Alibris| Powells| Audible (click on the picture to get to Amazon)| Kobo


 

Did I like The Secret Garden when I first read it? No, I didn’t. In my defense, I was around 9 years old when I read it and I thought it was super boring. I reread it in my teens and that’s when I loved it. I have reread it several times since then and still loved the book.

Would I read The Secret Garden now? Yes. I have actually read it a few years ago. Target had a copy of it in its $1 bin. So, I picked it up and read it to my son and daughter (who were 4 and 6 at the time).

How many stars did I give The Secret Garden when I first read it? Well, if I have to go by 9 years old me, it would have gotten 2 stars…lol. I wasn’t very knowledgeable about books back then.

How many stars would I give The Secret Garden now? 5 stars.


Have you read The Secret Garden?

Love it?  Hate it? Meh about it?

Let me know!!!