Weekly Wrap Up: February 23rd through February 29th 2020

Books I’ve Read:

Queen of the Unwanted

Starting Over at Blueberry Creek


Books with Pending Reviews:

Shorefall—Review coming April 21st

In Her Shadow—Review coming April 21st

Truths I Never Told You—Review Coming April 14th

The New Husband—Review coming April 14th


Books with Published Reviews:

Tucker—Review Here

Wild, Wild Rake—Review Here

A Highlander in a Pickup—Review Here

Follow Me—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

Trailing the Hunter—Author request

Tigers, Not Daughters—Blog Tour confirmation from Algonquin Young Readers

A Sweet Mess—Blog Tour request from St. Martins Griffin

Surrender Your Sons—Wished granted by North Star Editions/Flux

Pivotal Decisions—Author Request

Until I Find You—St. Martin’s Press/St. Martin’s Griffin request

What You Wish For—St. Martin’s Press request


NetGalley Requests:


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

Tucker—Blog Tour

Wild, Wild Rake—Blog Tour


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

WWW Wednesday: February 26th, 2020

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WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


Bookish Stuff:

I wasn’t able to finish reading all the books I had on last weeks “What I Think I’ll Read Next.” I got hung up on Shorefall. As much as I liked it, it was a slow read. Add on that I wasn’t feeling so great last week and I didn’t get much read.

Week 2 of my NetGalley ban. Publishers are reaching out to me but I am holding strong and not requesting anything.

Because I was feeling yucky the last half of last week, I didn’t edit any posts. I plan on editing some either today or tomorrow (not sure what day).


What I am currently reading:

Starting Over at Blueberry Creek: Includes a bonus novella (Sweetwater Springs Book 4)

USA Today bestselling author Annie Rains welcomes you back to Sweetwater Springs, North Carolina, with a charming friends-to-lovers story between a sexy fireman and the beautiful woman who mends his heart.


I recently finished reading:

Shorefall (Founders, #2)

The upstart firm Foundryside is struggling to make it. Orso Igancio and his star employee, former thief Sancia Grado, are accomplishing brilliant things with scriving, the magical art of encoding sentience into everyday objects, but it’s not enough. The massive merchant houses of Tevanne won’t tolerate competition, and they’re willing to do anything to crush Foundryside.

But even the merchant houses of Tevanne might have met their match. An immensely powerful and deadly entity has been resurrected in the shadows of Tevanne, one that’s not interested in wealth or trade routes: a hierophant, one of the ancient practitioners of scriving. And he has a great fascination for Foundryside, and its employees – especially Sancia.

Now Sancia and the rest of Foundryside must race to combat this new menace, which means understanding the origins of scriving itself – before the hierophant burns Tevanne to the ground.


What books I think I’ll read next:

Queen of the Unwanted (The Women's War, #2)

In this feminist fantasy series, the ability to do magic has given women control over their own bodies. But as the patriarchy starts to fall, they must now learn to rule as women, not men.

Alys may be the acknowledged queen of Women’s Well—the fledgling colony where women hold equal status with men—but she cares little for politics in the wake of an appalling personal tragedy. It is grief that rules her now. But the world continues to turn.

In a distant realm unused to female rulers, Ellin struggles to maintain control. Meanwhile, the king of the island nation of Khalpar recruits an abbess whom he thinks holds the key to reversing the spell that Alys’s mother gave her life to create. And back in Women’s Well, Alys’s own half-brother is determined to bring her to heel. Unless these women can all come together and embrace the true nature of female power, everything they have struggled to achieve may be at risk.

The Only Good Indians

The creeping horror of Paul Tremblay meets Tommy Orange’s There There in a dark novel of revenge, cultural identity, and the cost of breaking from tradition in this latest novel from the Jordan Peele of horror literature, Stephen Graham Jones.

Seamlessly blending classic horror and a dramatic narrative with sharp social commentary, The Only Good Indians follows four American Indian men after a disturbing event from their youth puts them in a desperate struggle for their lives. Tracked by an entity bent on revenge, these childhood friends are helpless as the culture and traditions they left behind catch up to them in a violent, vengeful way.

Paris Never Leaves You

Living through WWII working in a Paris bookstore with her young daughter, Vivi, and fighting for her life, Charlotte is no victim, she is a survivor. But can she survive the next chapter of her life?

Alternating between wartime Paris and 1950s New York publishing, Paris Never Leaves You is an extraordinary story of resilience, love, and impossible choices, exploring how survival never comes without a cost.

The war is over, but the past is never past.

The Dilemma

It’s Livia’s fortieth birthday and tonight she’s having a party, a party she’s been planning for a long time. The only person missing will be her daughter, Marnie.

But Livia has a secret, a secret she’s been keeping from Adam, her husband, until the party is over. Because how can she tell him that although she loves Marnie, she’s glad their daughter won’t be there to celebrate with her?

Adam is determined everything will be just right for Livia and the party is going to be perfect… until he learns something that will leave him facing an unbearable decision.

Losing Kyler (The Kennedy Boys, #2)

Condemned to repeat the sins of the past…

Faye thought losing her parents was the most devastating thing to happen to her, but she was wrong. Her uncle’s scandalous revelation has sent her into a tailspin, leaving her questioning her entire existence.

Everything she believed is built on a lie.

And the one person she shares a passionate, soul-deep connection with can’t be there for her.

Faye and Ky can’t be together. It’s forbidden. Though they are determined to avoid replicating their parents’ mistakes, caving to their feelings is as tempting as the apple in the Garden of Eden.

Ky had sworn off girls until Faye bulldozed her way into his life. Now, she’s his whole world, and their forced separation is crushing him. Once his manipulative ex resurfaces—hell-bent on ruining the Kennedys—he’ll do whatever it takes to protect his loved ones including turning his back on the one person he can’t live without.

Then tragedy strikes and all bets are off.

But is it too late?

When Faye needs him and he isn’t there for her, guilt and hurt threaten to obliterate their love. As they start to rebuild their fractured hearts, another sordid family secret is uncovered, and Faye worries Ky may be lost to her forever.

But can you truly lose someone if they don’t want to be found?

Please note this series is only recommended to readers age 17+ due to mature content and themes.

Weekly Wrap Up: February 16th through February 22nd 2020

Books I’ve Read:

Shorefall

In Her Shadow

Truths I Never Told You

The New Husband

A Bad Day for Sunshine


Books with Pending Reviews:

A Bad Day for Sunshine—Review coming April 7th, 2020

Odriel’s Heirs—Review coming March 1st, 2020

Highland Sword—Review coming March 31st, 2020

The Last Human—Review coming March 24th, 2020


Books with Published Reviews:

Lily for My Enemy—Review Here

The Borgia Confessions—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

Big Summer—Atria Books request

Tales from Ara: Valentine’s Special—Author Request

Tales from Ara: Lost Dimensions—Author Request

Hello, Summer—St. Martin’s Press request


NetGalley Requests:

Gone with the Rogue


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

The Borgia Confessions—Blog Tour


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Blog Tour: The Borgia Confessions by Alyssa Palombo

The Borgia Confessions: A Novel by [Palombo, Alyssa]

4 Stars

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press, St. Martin’s Griffin

Date of publication: February 11th, 2020

Genre: Historical Fiction

Where you can find The Borgia Confessions: Barnes and Noble | Amazon | BookBub

Book Synopsis:

During the sweltering Roman summer of 1492, Rodrigo Borgia has risen to power as pope. Rodrigo’s eldest son Cesare, forced to follow his father into the church and newly made the Archbishop of Valencia, chafes at his ecclesiastical role and fumes with jealousy and resentment at the way that his foolish brother has been chosen for the military greatness he desired.

Maddalena Moretti comes from the countryside, where she has seen how the whims of powerful men wreak havoc on the lives of ordinary people. But now, employed as a servant in the Vatican Palace, she cannot help but be entranced by Cesare Borgia’s handsome face and manner and finds her faith and conviction crumbling in her want of him.

As war rages and shifting alliances challenge the pope’s authority, Maddalena and Cesare’s lives grow inexplicably entwined. Maddalena becomes a keeper of dangerous Borgia secrets, and must decide if she is willing to be a pawn in the power games of the man she loves. And as jealousy and betrayal threaten to tear apart the Borgia family from within, Cesare is forced to reckon with his seemingly limitless ambition.

Alyssa Palombo’s captivating new novel, The Borgia Confessions, is a story of passion, politics, and class, set against the rise and fall of one of Italy’s most infamous families–the Borgias.


First Line:

The day I learned of my father’s plans for me, I was but nine years old.

The Borgia Confessions by Alyssa Palombo

My Review:

I don’t know about you, but I haven’t heard a ton about the Borgia’s. What information I knew had been picked up in other books. So, when I was approached to the blog tour for The Borgia Confessions, I was intrigued. The blog painted the book as a romance set in Renaissance Italy. Then I read the book and man; it is more than what I thought. And I mean that in the absolute best way!!

The Borgia Confessions is told from the viewpoint of Cesare (1st person) and Maddalena (1st person). I am not a fan of dual storylines, but in this case, it was needed.

The pacing of The Borgia Confessions was fast-paced. It needed to be, considering the author was writing about a time where wars ended politics and people being murdered was commonplace. There were no dropped storylines, no dropped characters, and I didn’t have any issues keeping up with the plotline. What I enjoyed is that even though the plotline was fast-paced, I didn’t have to go back and reread chapters. That was a massive plus for me.

I will admit that I did some research into Cesare Borgia after I read the book. The author did a great job of keeping to who Cesare was. He was not a nice man. He murdered, bribed, and man whored. There was a hint of the scandal between him and Lucretiza. But, the author only let it stay a hint. The majority of the book focused on Cesare, his issues, and of course, his romance with Maddalena.

I did like Maddalena, and I loved the insight that her character gave to what was happening behind the scenes. But I found her almost too pious. Her constant praying and thinking about sin got on my nerves. I also wasn’t a fan of how two-sided she was. She was quick to condemn Cesare when he was sleeping with his brother’s wife. But when she was sleeping with him and was condemned by the other servants, she was hurt. I kept thinking to myself, “Can’t have it both ways, buttercup.

I did think Cesare was a manwhore. Him being a Cardinal didn’t slow him down. He went after anything in skirts. That included his own brother’s wife. I was expecting Maddalena and him to hook up, but I wasn’t expecting it to be as late in the book as it was. Honestly, I was glad. I liked that Cesare and Maddalena were able to form a relationship before they got involved. Did I believe that Cesare loved Maddalena? Yes, I do. I do think that in his way, he did.

The end of The Borgia Confessions was rather abrupt. I was left wondering what happened to Maddalena and Cesare. The author’s note, afterward, did clear up any questions that I had. The author, in her note, also explained why she didn’t touch upon the rumors that surrounded Cesare, Lucretiza, and Pope Alexander’s incestuous relationship. She also told why she changed Joffre and Juan’s names. In real life, they were Gioffre and Giovanni.


I would give The Borgia Confessions an Adult rating. There is sex. There is language. There is violence. I would recommend that no one under the age of 21 read this book.

I would reread The Borgia Confessions. I would recommend it to family and friends.

**I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book**

Weekly Wrap Up: February 9th through February 15th 2020

Books I’ve Read:

Odriel’s Heirs

Highland Sword

The Last Human


Books with Pending Reviews:

You Are Not Alone—Review coming March 3rd

The Borgia Confessions—Review coming February 20th

Lily for My Enemy—Review coming February 21st

A Highlander in a Pickup—Review coming February 25th

Wild, Wild Rake—Review coming February 26th

All the Best Lies—Review coming February 11th


Books with Published Reviews:

All the Best Lies—Review Here

Been There, Married That—Review Here

Foul is Fair—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

Don’t Look for Me


NetGalley Requests:

Devolution—wish granted from Random House Publishing Group – Ballantine, Del Ray


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

Foul is Fair—Blog Tour

The Mocking Man—Book Blitz


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Weekly Wrap Up: February 2nd through February 8th 2020

Books I’ve Read:

You Are Not Alone

The Borgia Confessions

A Lily for My Enemy (not on Goodreads Yet)

A Highlander in a Pickup

Stepbrother with Benefits

The Secret (no review)


Books with Pending Reviews:

Been There, Married That—Review coming February 11th


Books with Published Reviews:

Stepbrother with Benefits—Review Here

An Everyday Hero—Review Here

Things in Jars—Review Here

The Impossible Castle—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

Silk and Thorne—Author Request

We Came Here to Shine—Publisher Request (St. Martin’s Press/St. Martin’s Griffin)

Lily for My Enemy—Author Request (not on Goodreads yet)

The Vacation—Publisher Request (St. Martin’s Press)

Who Did You Tell—Publisher Request (Random House Publishing Group – Ballantine, Ballantine Books)


NetGalley Requests:

The Split

The Fiery Crown

When You Wish Upon a Rogue

Flame

To Catch an Earl


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:

An Everyday Hero-–Blog Tour


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Blog Tour: An Everyday Hero (A Heart of a Hero: Book 2) by Laura Trentham

An Everyday Hero (Heart of a Hero Book 2) by [Trentham, Laura]

4 Stars

Publisher: St. Martin’s Press, St. Martin’s Griffin

Date of publication: February 4th, 2020

Genre: Romance, Women’s Fiction

Series: A Heart of a Hero

The Military Wife—-Book 1 (Review Here)

An Everyday Hero—Book 2

Where you can find An Everyday Hero: Barnes and Noble | Amazon | BookBub

Book Synopsis:

From award-winning author Laura Trentham comes an emotionally layered novel about redemption, second chances and discovering that life is worth fighting for.

At thirty, Greer Hadley never expected to be forced home to Madison, Tennessee with her life and dreams of being a songwriter up in flames. To make matters worse, a series of bad decisions and even crappier luck lands her community service hours at a nonprofit organization that aids veterans and their families. Greer cannot fathom how she’s supposed to use music to help anyone deal with their trauma and loss when the one thing that brought her joy has failed her.

When Greer meets fifteen-year-old Ally Martinez, her plans to stay detached and do as little as possible get thrown away. New to town and dealing with the death of her father in action, she hides her emotions behind a mask of bitterness and sarcasm, but Greer is able to see past it and recognizes pieces of who she once was in Ally. The raw and obvious talent she possesses could take her to the top and Greer vows to make sure life’s negativities don’t derail Ally’s potential.

After Greer is assigned a veteran to help, she’s not surprised Emmett Lawson, the town’s golden boy, followed his family’s legacy. What leaves her shocked is the shell of a man who believes he doesn’t deserve anyone’s help. A breakthrough with Ally reminds Greer that no one is worth giving up on. So she shows up one day with his old guitar, and meets Emmett’s rage head on with her stubbornness. When a situation with Ally becomes dire, the two of them must become a team to save her—and along the way they might just save themselves too.


First Line:

Disorderly conduct.

An Everyday Hero by Laura Trentham

My Review:

For some reason, I have been reading a lot (and stress, a lot) of military-themed romances lately. I am not a massive fan of them. 90% of the book I have read, the soldiers come back from battle with PTSD or missing limbs, which is fine by me. But, by the middle or the end of the book, the love of a good woman makes their PTSD go away or they miraculously come to terms with how they lost their limbs. Not realistic, and that is the main reason why I stopped reading them. But, then I picked up the first book in A Heart of a Hero series and read a book where things didn’t go away. The hero and the heroine had to deal with their issues. That reason alone, I decided to read An Everyday Hero. I was impressed with what I read and the tact that the author showed when writing about PTSD in veterans.

The plotline for An Everyday Hero was medium paced. That allowed the author to develop the main character’s personalities and relationships with each other. It also allowed for the two main plotlines to be able to mature and then merge. I loved it.

I loved Greer. She had one of the more epic introductions that I have read, ever. I loved her sass and her wit during the book. She was the right choice to send over to get Emmett off his butt. I did find her character a little too much at times, but she was larger than life presence in the book. Her interactions with Ally were gold also.

Emmett made me cry several times during the book. His guilt and regret over what happened to his sergeant were palpable. I didn’t quite understand why he was so angry at his father at first. But as the book went on, I was able to piece things together. His character growth throughout the book was incredible. I loved seeing him at the end of the book, knowing what he had come from.

Emmett and Greer’s romance was medium paced. There were a few chapters of “does he/she or doesn’t he/she” going on for me. I liked that the author paced it that way, though. It allowed for Emmett and Greer to build their friendship. As for the sex, the author chose to be semi-clean with this book. I say semi-clean because while they do have sex, she didn’t go into detail. I loved it. I feel if she went into detail, it would have taken away from the more critical parts of the book.

The storyline with Ally was heartbreaking. But, I was surprised that when Ally told Greer about the online bullying, that Greer did nothing about it. She didn’t mention it to Angela (the head of the music therapy program). Instead, it was just dropped. I felt that it was an essential part of Ally’s story. It, along with the other issues, showed how tough she had it. I was a little disappointed about that. But overall, I did enjoy how Ally’s character grew during the book. I also enjoyed the twist that was revealed almost at the end of the book. I saw it coming, but I still enjoyed it.

The storyline with Greer, her community service, music therapy, and her issues was excellent. I loved seeing Greer grow during that storyline. I loved seeing her rediscover her love of music as she helped Ally.

The storyline with Wayne (who skeeved me out) was dropped after Greer invoked Emmett’s name. I was a little disappointed because up until that point, I thought he was going to turn out to be a “bad guy.” Plus, I wouldn’t say I liked that Greer had resort to using Emmett’s name to get Wayne to back off. It didn’t sit right with me.

I was also confused as to how An Everyday Hero fits in the A Heart of a Hero series. Other than Karen and Ally coming from Fort Knox, there was no connection to the other book. Maybe I missed something.

The end of An Everyday Hero was bittersweet. From the minute Emmett helped the foal be born to the not so surprising epilogue, I was a mess. The twist with Ally happened during that time. I will say that Greer’s parents were saints and that Emmett’s father ended up being not such a bad guy. The epilogue was a little predictable. I guessed everything that happened. Still, it was a great ending to the book.


I would give An Everyday Hero an Adult rating. There is sex. There is language. There is mild violence. I would recommend that no one under the age of 21 read this book.

I would reread An Everyday Hero. I would recommend it to family and friends.

**I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book**

WWW Wednesday: January 29th, 2019

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WWW Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam at Taking on a World of Words.

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?


Bookish Update:

I have been doing good not requesting anything from NetGalley. Because of that, I have put a huge dent in my current titles shelf. I was getting books off quickly until…I started reading The Impossible Castle. That took me 5 days to read. 5 flipping days!!!!!! I almost DNF’d a couple of times. But, once I start reading a book, I need to finish it, even if I didn’t enjoy it or like it.

I also changed the theme of my blog. I wanted something that was simple and this one is perfect. Along with changing the theme of my blog, I have been cleaning up posts. Checking/updating links, updating covers/synopsis, checking to see if the book is still on Goodreads/Amazon and removing those that aren’t. You would be surprised at how many books I have taken off!!

I am still taking things gradual with getting back into blogging. Weekends are still off the table. I look forward to blogging on Monday now.

So, that’s it. Everything that has happened to me in a nutshell over this past month. I will try to do this on a weekly basis but I can’t guarantee it.


What I am currently reading:

Been There, Married That

A hilarious new novel full of Hollywood glitz, glamour, and scandal.

When he changes the locks, she changes the rules.

Agnes Murphy Nash is the perfect Hollywood wife – she has the right friends, the right clothes, and even a side career of her own as a writer. Her husband Trevor is a bigshot producer, and from the outside it looks like they’re living a picture-perfect celebrity life, complete with tennis tournaments and lavish parties.

But the job description of a Hollywood wife doesn’t cover divorce, which is the way Agnes’ life is headed after she comes home one day to find her credit cards cancelled and the security passwords to get into her enormous LA home changed. Oh, and there’s a guy there whose job it is to tase her if she tries to enter…which she does. Needless to say, Agnes’ husband is dead set on making sure she loses big time, but Agnes isn’t the type to just lie down and take it. In a world of fremenies and hot nannies, personal psychics and “skinny” jello shots, Agnes may be losing her husband, but could that mean getting her own life back?

Been There, Married That is a drop-dead hilarious battle of wills that will make you laugh out loud, cringe, and keep turning the pages to see what crazy disaster will happen to Agnes next…and how she’ll rise from the ashes.


I recently finished reading:

Things in Jars

In the dark underbelly of Victorian London, a formidable female sleuth is pulled into the macabre world of fanatical anatomists and crooked surgeons while investigating the kidnapping of an extraordinary child in this gothic mystery—perfect for fans of The Essex Serpent and The Book of Speculation.

Bridie Devine—female detective extraordinaire—is confronted with the most baffling puzzle yet: the kidnapping of Christabel Berwick, secret daughter of Sir Edmund Athelstan Berwick, and a peculiar child whose reputed supernatural powers have captured the unwanted attention of collectors trading curiosities in this age of discovery.

Winding her way through the labyrinthine, sooty streets of Victorian London, Bridie won’t rest until she finds the young girl, even if it means unearthing a past that she’d rather keep buried. Luckily, her search is aided by an enchanting cast of characters, including a seven-foot tall housemaid; a melancholic, tattoo-covered ghost; and an avuncular apothecary. But secrets abound in this foggy underworld where spectacle is king and nothing is quite what it seems.

Blending darkness and light, history and folklore, Things in Jars is a spellbinding Gothic mystery that collapses the boundary between fact and fairy tale to stunning effect and explores what it means to be human in inhumane times.


What books I think I’ll read next:

All the Best Lies (Ellery Hathaway #3)

The highly anticipated third novel in the award-winning Ellery Hathaway mystery series.

FBI agent Reed Markham is haunted by one painful unsolved mystery: who murdered his mother? Camilla was brutally stabbed to death more than forty years ago while baby Reed lay in his crib mere steps away. The trail went so cold that the Las Vegas Police Department has given up hope of solving the case. But then a shattering family secret changes everything Reed knows about his origins, his murdered mother, and his powerful adoptive father, state senator Angus Markham. Now Reed has to wonder if his mother’s killer is uncomfortably close to home.

Unable to trust his family with the details of his personal investigation, Reed enlists his friend, suspended cop Ellery Hathaway, to join his quest in Vegas. Ellery has experience with both troubled families and diabolical murderers, having narrowly escaped from each of them. She’s eager to skip town, too, because her own father, who abandoned her years ago, is suddenly desperate to get back in contact. He also has a secret that could change her life forever, if Ellery will let him close enough to hear it.

Far from home and relying only on each other, Reed and Ellery discover young Camilla had snared the attention of dangerous men, any of whom might have wanted to shut her up for good. They start tracing his twisted family history, knowing the path leads back to a vicious killer—one who has been hiding in plain sight for forty years and isn’t about to give up now.

Wild, Wild Rake (The Cavensham Heiresses #6)

Her first marriage was an epic failure.

Lady Avalon Warwyck never did love her husband. Arrogant, selfish, and cruel, it’s a blessing when she’s widowed and left to raise her son all by herself. Finally, Avalon can live freely and do the work she loves: helping fallen women become businesswomen. She’s lived these past ten years with no desire to remarry―that is, until Mr. Devan Farris comes to town.

Can he convince her to take another chance at happily ever after?

Devan Farris―charming vicar, reputed rake, and the brother of Avalon’s son’s guardian―is reluctantly sent to town to keep tabs on Avalon and her son. Devan wishes he didn’t have to meddle in her affairs; he’s not one to trod on a woman’s independent nature and keen sense of convictions. But she’ll have nothing to do with vicar with a wild reputation―even though he’s never given his heart and body to another. If only he could find a way to show Avalon who he really is on the inside―a good, true soul looking for its other half. But how can prove that he wants to love and care for her. . .until death do they part?

A Highlander in a Pickup (Highland, Georgia, #2)

A Highlander in a Pickup is the second book in award-winning author Laura Trentham’s romantic comedy Highland Georgia series, full of love, laughs…and highlanders!

When a gorgeous new man—in a kilt—comes to town, life in Highland, Georgia will never be the same…

Iain Connors is the poster boy for the strong and silent type. Growing up a loner at Cairndow Castle in Scotland with only the cliffs and moors for company, it’s understood Iain will assume the mantle of Cairndow groundskeeper when his father is ready to relinquish it. But his stint in Her Majesty’s Armed Forces has opened up a whole new world—and now, rather than settle down, he accepts an invitation to travel to the States to take charge of the Highland Games. After all, he’s led men into battle, how hard can planning a party be?

Anna Maitland is ready to step up for her best friend Isabel Blackmoor, who can’t run the Games in their hometown this year. Surely Anna, a dance instructor with boundless energy, spirit, and charm, is up for the challenge? What she doesn’t anticipate is a man in a kilt who turns up claiming he’s the one in charge. What’s worse about this Iain? He’s so infuriatingly handsome that she can’t help but fantasize about him whispering sweet-nothings in her ear in his rumbly, sexy brogue. . .

The Borgia Confessions

During the sweltering Roman summer of 1492, Rodrigo Borgia has risen to power as pope. Rodrigo’s eldest son Cesare, forced to follow his father into the church and newly made the Archbishop of Valencia, chafes at his ecclesiastical role and fumes with jealousy and resentment at the way that his foolish brother has been chosen for the military greatness he desired.

Maddalena Moretti comes from the countryside, where she has seen how the whims of powerful men wreak havoc on the lives of ordinary people. But now, employed as a servant in the Vatican Palace, she cannot help but be entranced by Cesare Borgia’s handsome face and manner and finds her faith and conviction crumbling in her want of him.

As war rages and shifting alliances challenge the pope’s authority, Maddalena and Cesare’s lives grow inexplicably entwined. Maddalena becomes a keeper of dangerous Borgia secrets, and must decide if she is willing to be a pawn in the power games of the man she loves. And as jealousy and betrayal threaten to tear apart the Borgia family from within, Cesare is forced to reckon with his seemingly limitless ambition.

Alyssa Palombo’s captivating new novel, The Borgia Confessions, is a story of passion, politics, and class, set against the rise and fall of one of Italy’s most infamous families–the Borgias.

You Are Not Alone

You probably know someone like Shay Miller.
She wants to find love, but it eludes her.
She wants to be fulfilled, but her job is a dead end.
She wants to belong, but her life is so isolated.

You probably don’t know anyone like the Moore sisters.
They have an unbreakable circle of friends.
They live the most glamorous life.
They always get what they desire.

Shay thinks she wants their life.
But what they really want is hers.

The Last Human

The last human in the universe is on the run from a godlike intelligence in this rip-roaring debut space opera.

Sarya is the civilized galaxy’s worst nightmare: a Human.

Most days, Sarya doesn’t feel like the most terrifying creature in the galaxy.

Most days, she’s got other things on her mind. Like hiding her identity among the hundreds of alien species roaming the corridors of Watertower Station. Or making sure her adoptive mother doesn’t casually eviscerate one of their neighbors. Again.

And most days, she can almost accept that she’ll never know the truth–that she’ll never know why humanity was deemed too dangerous to exist. Or whether she really is–impossibly–the lone survivor of a species destroyed a millennium ago.

That is, until an encounter with a bounty hunter and a miles-long kinetic projectile leaves her life and her perspective shattered.

Thrown into the universe at the helm of a stolen ship–with the dubious assistance of a rebellious spacesuit, an android death enthusiast on his sixtieth lifetime, and a ball of fluff with an IQ in the thousands–Sarya begins to uncover an impossible truth.

What if humanity’s death and her own existence are simply two moves in a demented cosmic game, one played out by vast alien intellects? Stranger still, what if these mad gods are offering Sarya a seat at their table–and a second chance for humanity?

The Last Human is a sneakily brilliant, gleefully oddball space-opera debut–a masterful play on perspective, intelligence, and free will, wrapped in a rollicking journey through a strange and crowded galaxy.

Weekly Wrap Up: January 19th through January 24th 2020

Books I’ve Read:

The Impossible Castle

Tucker


Books with Pending Reviews:

The Last Real Cowboy—Review coming January 28th

The Other People—Review coming January 28th.


Books with Published Reviews:

Jane Anonymous—Review Here

No Mercy—Review Here

The Vanishing Season—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

The Borgia Confessions–St. Martin’s Press/St. Martin’s Griffin

Hometown Girl—author request


NetGalley Requests:


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday

Weekly Wrap Up: January 5th through January 11th, 2019

Books I’ve Read:

No Mercy

The Vanishing Season

Small-Town Family

A Critical Tangent

An Everyday Hero

Wager for a Lady’s Hand: A Lockhart Sweet Regency Romance

Jesse, Jake, and the Return to Antheia (no Goodreads Page)


Books with Pending Reviews:

An Everyday Hero—Review coming February 7th


Books with Published Reviews:

A Critical Tangent—Review Here

The God Game—Review Here

Westering Women—Review Here

Wager for a Lady’s Hand—Review Here

Jesse, Jake and the Return of Antheia—Review Here


Author/Publisher Requests:

Starting Over at Blueberry Creek—Forever (Grand Central Publishing)

Can’t Hurry Love—Forever (Grand Central Publishing)


NetGalley Requests:

My One True Cowboy


Blog Tours/Excerpts/Book Blitz/Cover Reveal:


Weekly Posts:

Weekly Wrap Up

Top Ten Tuesday

WWW Wednesday